Candidate Blog Post: Nathan’s Adventures in Uruguay

 

I am currently wrapping up my two months in Uruguay and it’s left me with so much knowledge of the language and the culture of the area in and around the Rio de La Plata. I often have thought that I adjust very well to new environments, but my first few days here were overwhelming without a doubt. The weather change, the language, learning the city, and just learning how things are done in a culture takes time, but I wish, looking back, that I hadn’t been so timid. I felt like everyone was watching me when I went out and I was so afraid of taking a wrong step so it took me a while to get in the habit of getting out and about regularly when in reality, there was nothing to be afraid of.

The people in Uruguay were very welcoming, I was lucky to make a friend that spoke good English who showed me around the city and I found the culture to be very relaxed. My Uruguayan friend uses the phrase “Manejate” to describe the culture here, which more or less translates to “Suit yourself”. Uruguayans are very relaxed and friendly so if you’re considering an excursion here, I would highly recommend it. The professors who taught my classes were extremely helpful and friendly and I met many other international students at the school who I became very close with.

All the advice you hear about these types of trips is true, the sooner you get yourself getting out and meeting people, the better your experience will be, but it’s easier said than done. I have taken so much from my trip here so far beyond my internship and I would recommend it to anyone considering such a trip. Cheers from Uruguay!

If you’re interested in interning abroad in Uruguay like Nathan, check out our Uruguay page.

Scotland from a Candidate’s Perspective

The Scotland Abroad Program spots fill up fast because of how organized and affordable the program is. Our two programs, Equine and Observation & Research, include housing, transportation from the airport, meals throughout the week and more! These programs allow you to expand your resume with international experience and give you the opportunity to travel the beautiful landmarks in Scotland.

Scotland – Equine Program

The Equine Program is a special four-week program available for animal science and pre-veterinary students. Candidates are enrolled into two courses, Equine Anatomy & Physiology and Equine Fitness. These two units will give you six hours of US credit and are fully transferable towards your degree. When future employers look at a candidate’s resume, they find interest in their experience abroad because it reassures them that the candidate is capable of working outside their comfort zone. Candidates take advantage of this learning experience and travel on the weekends to nearby locations, which tends to be affordable.

Scotland

 

Scotland – Observation & Research Program

The Observation & Research Program is aimed at serious students with academic observational and research assignments in different sectors, which include agricultural business, ecology and conservation, psychology, speech and hearing sciences and more! This six-week program, like the Equine Program, begins in mid-May and is one of our most popular summer programs.

Scotland

Candidate Spotlight – Natalie M.

Our Scotland programs are one of the most popular programs for our summer candidates. We like to receive feedback and stories from our candidates about their experiences during the internship/study abroad program itself. It gives you, the reader, a better understanding of what you could possibly do in the future.  Our Observation and Research candidate, Natalie M., wrote about her time in Scotland and gave us more insight on what it’s like to be an intern abroad.
Check it out!

Observation & Research Candidate, Natalie M., Blog

Scotland

 

 

Interning Abroad after Graduation

Why Should You Intern Abroad after Graduation?

For most seniors, graduation is just around the corner, thank goodness. The instant panic of “What am I going to do now?” hits you real quick. You feel like you haven’t learned enough to step out into the “real world.” What happened to the confident junior who was so ready to graduate? Not here. You’re looking through job applications, ready to send in your mediocre resume, when all you want to do is try new things and do something adventurous before getting stuck at a 9 to 5 like the rest of your friends. Who wants to hire a recent graduate?

via GIPHY

Interning abroad gives you the opportunity to work AND travel, it’s the best of both worlds. There are many benefits to interning abroad, especially after graduation. Pack up your things and do something for YOU. You’ve worked too hard these past four to five years not to treat yourself. You’re not just wondering around in a different country; you’re doing hands-on work and making use of that brand new degree.

Work Experience

via GIPHY

An intern abroad means you’re going to be working part-time for a couple of days during the week. You finally have the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned these last few years and apply them to real situations. As an intern, you’re placed into the workforce without having the pressure of long-term commitment to the job, and you get to learn a little bit of everything. It’s the dating version of relationships, who would have known.

Internships give you the opportunity to learn what you didn’t have the chance to learn at school, or probably couldn’t learn from just going to school.  Hands-on experience is more fulfilling than sitting in a classroom, and you learn more about the work environment while adjusting to daily challenges and learning how to handle new situations. You’re no longer just “adulting” because you’re an adult (somewhat).

Future Employment

via GIPHY

Future employers want to know that you’re capable of handling the work in your industry and keep yourself professional. The first thing they’re going to check on your resume is your past work experiences and for how long you were there. An article released by Psychology Today showed how 82 percent of hiring managers wanted to see a formally completed internship on resumes. They’re practically a necessity, and it’s a struggle for students to find internships nowadays because the demand for them is high.

If interning improves your chances of getting hired, can you imagine how good it looks when you’ve interned in another country? By completing an internship abroad, you’re exposing yourself to growth far outside your comfort zone. An internship abroad shows employers that you’re open to new things and have experienced a global perspective of the industry you’re working in. You’ve interacted with people from diverse backgrounds, and it makes you stand out. So many cookie points.

Taking Chances

via GIPHY

When was the last time you tried something different or did something you’ve never done before? Think about it. As humans, we try to put ourselves into a routine because it feels safe. For once in your life, don’t place yourself into a routine.  When you’re abroad you don’t have a set routine; you have to learn how to adjust to the new culture and surroundings. It’s not a bad thing.

Travel

via GIPHY

Travel. Travel. Travel. Everyone talks about how much they want to travel but they never actually do it. You don’t want to regret not visiting half of the world in your 20s. This is your chance! You might be working, but there is such thing as weekends.

As an intern, your work hours aren’t as intense, and you have more time to do things, things you weren’t able to do when you were going to school. Try new food. Oh, all of the good food you’ve seen in travel shows and movies where the main character is living their best life in a new country. The time to travel is now, so stop pushing it aside.

Self-Growth

via GIPHY

You’re finally out on your own. Experiencing the world without anything tying you down is fulfilling. It’s an incredible feeling. It might seem scary, being in a new place without your family or your friends. Trust me, you’ll make some new friends, and this new place will feel like home. Independence opens you up, and you learn more about yourself than you imagined.

You also get to learn what it’s like to work in an industry you’ve studied. Did you make the right choice? If not, you have the chance to learn what you do like to do. You become a lot more confident because you know yourself a more now. You’re basically having your own Eat Pray Love moment, and that’s fine.

 

Don’t doubt your capabilities. After graduating, grab your passport and explore the world, yourself, and the career you see yourself having in the future. It will have more of a positive impact on you than you realize.

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months - Adelante Abroad

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months?

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months - Adelante Abroad

The obvious answer is you should go abroad for as long as possible! Everyone wants to travel abroad, that’s a no brainer, but obviously you clicked this blog post because you are trying decide between one or six months.

via GIPHY

A one month internship or study abroad program is usually a faculty-led program by your school, volunteering or teaching English. All of those choices are very good options and one should consider those if you have the time and money. However, you are really limiting yourself to learning about the culture and living like a local by only going for one month. You might have a week or two of language courses, depending on where you go and your program, and that leaves you two weeks to really be immersed in the culture. To me, a one month program is like a sample at Costco. You get a taste of it and you leave wanting more.

via GIPHY

If you were to consider taking a one month program, you should do it as a way to earn college credit. A faculty-led program is expensive but you do get to earn that credit abroad, which is always a nice thing to experience. Plus your course will be taught in English! So you don’t have to worry too much about being completely lost in the textbooks.

A six month internship or study abroad program is something I would highly recommend and encourage people to take. Six months is a long time in a country you’ve never lived in and – to me – that is so exciting! You have that adjustment period of about a month (it’s different for everyone) and after that you have five months to really just live like a local and be completely immersed in the food, culture, traditions and festivals! In six months, you will be knowledgeable about the city and country you are living in. It’s a no brainer you’ll adapt to your surroundings but it’s the most rewarding when you get to say you’ve experienced life abroad for six months.

via GIPHY

People will be in awe and will ask you tons of questions about your time abroad. If you’re there for a month you’ll leave saying, “I wish I stayed longer,” or “I wish I picked a six month internship instead.” Do you want to sound like that? I know I wouldn’t.

I was featured in a video with Alexandria, Adelante’s digital marketing specialist, discussing why you should take an internship for more than three months. There is some useful information in that video and reiterates some of the points made in this post. Take a look and see why it’s important to take an internship or a study abroad program for more than three months.

Regardless, the decision to go abroad is a huge one! You should congratulate yourself for just wanting to study or intern abroad. Do what makes you comfortable. If going for a month is your thing, then by all means sign up for a month! But if you’re looking to really experience life abroad, a six month program would be best.

About Our Contributor:

Drew - Digital Marketing Intern - Adelante Abroad

Drew is Adelante HQ’s Social Media & Marketing intern for Fall 2017 and is currently a Public Relations major at Cal State Long Beach. He has participated in a youth exchange program in Dakar, Senegal and an international basketball tournament in Japan. One of his many traveling goals is to step foot on every continent on this big blue planet, and yes, even Antarctica.

Adaeze in Seville - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Candidate Spotlight: Internship in Seville – Adaeze C.

Adaeze in Seville - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Why Choose to Intern in Seville?

President of Art Museum - Adaeze - Internship in Seville - Adelante AbroadChoosing Seville was easy, after speaking with a close friend who lived in Spain for many years, she suggested Seville because of the warmth of the people and its many festivals and holidays throughout the year like the ‘Semana Santa’ and ‘Fería de Abril’ which she knew I would enjoy. In addition to that, I was sold when she said the people from Barcelona speak a whole other language, Catalan, which may have been a bit difficult for me to grasp since I had only been taking Spanish lessons for two months prior to my leaving.

More About My Internship Program in Seville

Adaeze - Art Museum - Internships in Seville - Adelante AbroadMy internship has been an invaluable experience thus far and a turning point in my life. Besides experiencing independence from my parents (living on my own) for the first time, which I must admit feels amazing, what I am cherishing the most is embracing this new chapter and being present in the moment, experiencing every step towards creating a bright future for my family and country with respect to preserving the legacy of my father. The internship placement at ´Fundacion Pintor Amalio´ was a perfect choice, there are many similarities between my father and the painter Amalio. Amalio was a teacher, artist and poet, who created a foundation and donated ´365 Gestures of the Giralda´ 8 days before his death in 1995. The Foundation is currently headed by one of his daughters María José.

I am learning so much and really cannot wait to implement what I have learned when I return home. I am truly inspired. Spain is a magical place overflowing with love and appreciation for its culture. I believe I am well on my way and eternally grateful to Adelante Abroad for making it possible.

 

 

 

About the Contributor:

Adaeze is currently taking part in a 6-month art internship in Seville, Spain. Hear more about Adaeze’s journey on her blog!

 

Want to learn more about our program? Check out our internships in Seville!

Feria de Abril in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Feria de Abril in Seville: A Guide to One of Seville’s Most Popular Festivals

Feria de Abril in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Here at Adelante, we highly encourage our candidates to engulf themselves into new cultures. Whether they participate an internship or study abroad program, there’s always something to explore and experience for the first time.

Spring is one of our favorite times of the year due to the festivities held around Spain and South America. One of the most popular spring festivals is the Seville Fair, or Feria de abril de Sevilla.

 

Adaeze - Feria de Abril - Adelante Abroad

Adaeze C. preparing for Feria de Abril

What is Feria de Abril?

Feria de abril de Sevilla is held in Seville, Spain about two weeks after Easter Holy Week. The events run from Monday all the way to the following Sunday, but it’s very common to see festivities begin as early as that Saturday.

The first official night, Monday night, is known as “La Noche del Pescaito” or “Fish Night.” During the evening, fish is traditionally served for dinner while the Mayor of Seville switches on thousands of lights at midnight to emphasize the beginning of the festival.

By Tuesday, the festival brings in horseback parades filled with carriages, riders, bullfighters and breeders. Women wear their favorite flamenco dresses and dance with men dressed in traditional suits.

The rest of the week proceeds with more festivities as well as bull fights. Shows are held at the Plaza de Toros, and the top bullfighters appear during this week. You can easily participate in local activities and enjoy street food, circuses / carnivals, and dancing.

 

Flamenco Dress - Internships in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Adaeze C. and Adelante’s Seville Program Director, Catherine

What is the origin of Feria de Abril?

The traditions from the Seville Fair can be traced all the way back to the early 1800’s, where a cattle fair was held and continued every year afterward. Each year, more and more people joined in to celebrate and socialize together in Seville, which brought in ‘casetas’ for food, bars and music. By the 1920’s, Feria de abril became one of Seville’s biggest fiestas.

Looking to celebrate in Seville? If you missed this year’s Seville Fair, there’s still plenty of festivities and celebrations going on in the next few months!

There are also other celebrations happening in other parts of Spain, Ecuador, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay! Apply now to take advantage of Summer start dates!

human rights internship in ecuador

Interview with Conner S. – Human Rights Internship in Ecuador

human rights internship in ecuador

We spoke with our current candidate, Conner, who is enjoying his time right now in Quito, Ecuador, where he is completing a Law Internship Abroad in Human Rights.

Conner answered a few questions for us about his experience with our brand new program in Ecuador.

Conner - Internships in Ecuador - Adelante Abroad

Why Did You Choose to Intern in Ecuador?

I chose Ecuador because of the cultural influence of indigenous cultures. Seeing as I wanted to work with human rights in a legal setting, a large population of indigenous tribes, those of whom have maintained themselves in isolation of western influence up until the late 20th century, Ecuador, and DELE**, seemed like the best fit for me to match my legal and anthropological interests.

 

What’s a Typical Day Like in Your Internship?

Monday through Friday I wake up at 7 AM, have breakfast and get ready at home until 8-8:30 AM, then walk, run or taxi to work. At work, we have a small collaborative group that works together in brainstorming and project development. Right now, we are looking for funds to carry out projects. We always make an effort to have lunch together from 12-1 PM. We always wind up having interesting conversations about politics, culture, news, etc.

 

Conner - Ecuador Homestay - Adelante Abroad

How is Your Experience So Far Living in Quito?

My experience so far has been great due to a buddy at work who is my age that has taken me under his wing; taking me to play football, to parties, to cultural events, etc. Across the board, everyone is friendly.

 

What Have You Gained So Far From Your Program?

So far, I’ve gained linguistic abilities I didn’t have before, friends I didn’t have before, and eye opening, mind-expanding realizations that come from living in a different country. One sees how different everything is, which makes one re-examine his or her own country, instead of taking all institutions, values, cultural identities, political processes, etc., for granted. Living in a different country is an exercise in critical thinking.

**The Diploma of Spanish as a Foreign Language (DELE) is an official qualification, recognized by the Ministry of Education, Culture and Sport of Spain. For more information, visit www.dele.org.

Conner in Ecuador - Adelante Abroad

Interested in an internship in Ecuador? We have several spots still open for Summer in Quito and Ambato, as well as programs in Chile, Mexico, Uruguay, and Spain. July and August start dates are still available, but hurry before these spots are filled!

Internships in EcuadorNominated for GoAbroad’s 2017 New Innovative Program

Summer 2017 Internships

Apply Now for an Internship Abroad

Shayan V - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Adelante Internship Abroad is “Definitely Worth It!” – Candidate Spotlight with Shayan V.

 

Shayan V - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Here’s an article written by one of our recent candidates, Shayan, who just came back from her internship in Madrid! We offer year round internships in several countries for our candidates so that they have the opportunity to travel and intern any time of the year between one to twelve months.

Internship in Madrid – Definitely Worth It!

Let me start off by saying the decision to intern abroad has turned out to be the best decision I have made in my personal, professional and educational life. It’s hard to believe I was so nervous and scared at first but after support from my family and the staff at Adelante, I embarked on a once in a lifetime journey that changed my life.

Prior to this internship, I attended school at San Jose State University before taking a semester off in order to transfer schools. However, I did not want to waste the semester, and since I had always wanted to go abroad once I found out about Adelante, I was sold. I’m currently studying communications hoping to one day find a job working with a major sports organization. Since I’ve always been a huge fan of sports, especially Real Madrid Club de Fútbol, having this internship under my belt will definitely help me with my future career goals.

Why I Chose to Intern in Madrid

For as long as I can remember I’ve been in love with Spain. My dad lived in Madrid when he was younger so growing up he would always tell me stories about his adventures which made me fall even more in love with Spain, especially Madrid. I also learned a lot about Spain in my history classes which prompted me to do my own research and learn about the rich culture and beautiful scenery.

Finally, after years of obsessing over this beautiful country, my mom surprised me with a spring break trip to visit the place I wanted to see more than anywhere else in the world. I remember my mom specifically telling me to not get my hopes up because I’ve built up this amazing place and she doesn’t want me to be upset if it doesn’t meet all my expectations but as I expected, it exceeded all my expectations and she had to drag me back to America kicking and screaming. On the trip back home I told my mom that I would be back so I started planning my return the second I landed.

I’ve travelled around the United States, a few countries in Mexico and the Caribbean but nothing compares to Spain, particularly Madrid. There is a different atmosphere in this city and it welcomes every visitor with open arms. Madrid is the perfect mixture of old Europe mixed with modernization. The buildings rocket into the sky with the architectural design of the 19th century and the technology of the modern day. Around every corner is a plaza or square commemorating Spanish history and of course, an endless supply of museums to visit. Down every cobble stone street you will find an array of restaurants and bars serving a variety of tapas and drinks, and within those establishments you will not find a single person engulfed in their phone but instead they are enjoying each others company.

In case the history, the views and the food wasn’t enough, the city has some of the best shopping in all of Europe with an assortment of shops all over the city. It’s impossible to have a boring day in a city where you could spend a lifetime but still not see everything. However, the absolute best part of Madrid is the people who live there and I’m convinced the kindest, most generous people inhabit this city. Madrileños, as residents of Madrid are frequently referred as, are always willing to help recommend a place to eat, guide you in the right direction or simply help with your Spanish. The kindness of this city is the first thing a visitor will be exposed to which makes everyone who visits this city fall in love.

A Typical Day in Your Internship

As far as the internship, I was fortunate enough to intern with the Real Madrid Foundation | Real Madrid CF which turned out to be the greatest experience for my career goals. A typical day at my internship involved hopping on the Metro to Retiro Park in order to get to the practice field. I would meet with the coach of the team and we would discuss the plans for practice that day. The Real Madrid Foundation have many youth teams that play all over the city of Madrid and Retiro park just happens to be one of their practice grounds.

The coach would tell me her plans for practice and in order to help improve my Spanish I would be the one informing the young players. The practices usually consists of 3-5 exercises and a scrimmage at the end, once I finish explaining the exercises I would help guide the players making sure they were completing it correctly. Each practice is roughly 90 minutes and we work with two teams a day which made my schedule Monday-Thursday 5:30pm-8:30pm with occasional games on the weekends. Not only was the schedule easy to adapt to but every single person whom I encountered at the foundation and park provided me with support and assistance anytime I needed anything. They were all so welcoming and made the experience even better than it already was.

 

Living in Madrid

As excited as I was for this internship it was still rather difficult to adapt to in the beginning. The entire time I was speaking only in Spanish and even though the classes helped, I was still not extremely confident but after a few days and help from the coaches, it improved daily. Like I mentioned, the people in Madrid are extremely kind and helpful so if they see you’re struggling, like I was in the beginning, they are more than happy to help you.

 

What I Gained from My Internship Abroad

This was an opportunity that I would have never received in America. Being able to intern with such a respected foundation and having the ability to network provided me with professional relationships that I can potentially return to after I finish school. Living in a foreign country, being surrounded by a new culture and interning gave me a new perspective for my career path, encouraged my independence and the need to push myself to achieve my goals, and to put it simply, it was a fun adventure unlike anything I had ever done before. Regardless of what you do or where you go, you will grow from your experience and it will look amazing on a resume. For me, the ability to be submerged in the culture, learn Spanish, travel, and meet new people all while experiencing a once in a lifetime internship will forever shape the person I am.

– Shayan V. (Internships in Madrid, Spain)

Shayan V - Internship in Madrid - Adelante Abroad

 

It’s not too late to apply for a spring internship! Apply now for an internship starting in April 2017 by Wednesday, February 15. We offer several summer internship and study abroad opportunities in other parts of the world as well. Summer study abroad programs are available in Spain, Costa Rica and Scotland.

HowToAdult Realities - Adelante Abroad

6 #HowToAdult Realities When Going Abroad

HowToAdult Realities - Adelante Abroad

We All Have Had Those #HowToAdult Moments

Whether you’re 13 or 30, you’ve been through some kind of stage in your life where you had to start doing things without the help of your family. It’s definitely tough in the beginning, and you may not even realize how tough it was going to be. But eventually, it starts to become second nature.

The same reality goes with travelling abroad. Whether you choose to intern or study abroad for a few months, here are the realities on #HowToAdult when going abroad.

#1: You’re in Charge of Everything

Unfortunately, your parents or guardian can’t come with you to your abroad program. I mean, they could, but is that really what you want? Weren’t you trying to travel so that you could get away and explore on your own? Sooner or later, you’ll learn that you have to take charge of everything while abroad; fortunately, many programs provide you with some helpful resources prior to your travels.

Did you know that Adelante Abroad gives you a pre-departure orientation (PDO) packet a couple of months before your trip? That packet provides plenty of information on the area that you’ll be living in, plus helpful tips on going to different places. It can be a great resource to show you the next step in your travels.

#2: You Need to Learn How to Cook

While some internships are based in large urban cities, many programs are centered in rural areas, where grocery stores and restaurants are not as close by. What does that mean for you? It just means that you’ll have to experiment with local ingredients and mix them up in a kitchen pot. Yup, that’s right. You’ll need to cook.

Never cooked before? That’s alright. It is strongly advised to practice some basic cooking skills before travelling. Even if you’re not interning or studying abroad and just travelling on your wanderlust journey, cooking could save you hundreds of dollars on your trip.

You don’t have to be a culinary major to understand the foundations of cooking. Check out this WikiHow on cooking, or check out these 30+ dishes that anyone can make (quick tip: pasta is a great dish for starters).

#3: You Won’t Have a Cleaning Maid

You may have a host or hostess who comes in every so often to fix leaks or cracks where you’re staying, but they won’t be picking up dirty laundry for you. Although many of our parents teach us the importance of keeping a clean room or doing the dishes in early adolescence, not having someone remind you to clean up on your own may be a new experience.

Even the most seasoned college students and those who have lived alone for years can often forget a pile of clothes on the floor or even to vacuum the carpet from food crumps and dirt. Did you really think it just vanished magically?

Cleaning does not have to be difficult. Set up a reminder once or twice a week and dedicate a couple of hours to straightening up the house. You’ll be surprised what 20 minutes a day can do for an apartment. Look up “life hacks” online for quick tips on keeping your place looking nice and organized with little effort, too.

#4: Without a Budget, You Probably Won’t Last Too Long Abroad

If your parents have given you money before, and you’ve spent it all in less than a day, then this trip may be the best thing for you. Travelling abroad means being away from family, meaning being away from your constant cash flow that you were used to back at home.

It’s completely okay if you’ve never set up a budget for yourself before. Do you know how many adults in their 30s and 40s STILL don’t know how to budget? There are some easy ways to ensure that you don’t spend your entire savings halfway through your trip.

Do some research before you leave to determine how much money you need to save up. This includes cost of food (groceries and going out), transportation (bus and train passes, etc.), and souvenirs for yourself and your family.

Add some additional funds for emergencies (you never want to go without a backup). Then decide how you will split up your money each week. Write down what you spend and try not to go over your weekly budget.

If for some reason you end up spending more than planned, or there was an emergency, do not be afraid to contact your family for help. They may have extra money saved up for situations like these. However, this, of course, is a last resort.

#5: You Will Make Friends from Different Cultures

Here’s a shocker – you’ll probably meet other people just like yourself when you travel. And you’ll also probably meet people NOT like yourself when you travel. And that’s totally okay!

As you continue with your travels, you are going to meet people that you like a lot and people that you don’t like a lot. Your journey going abroad will bring these obstacles, but you will learn how to make friends with people from all over the world, many of which you might have not attempted to be friends with if you stayed at home.

You’ll learn different cultures and languages (especially if you’re in one of our Spanish countries), and those friends will be helpful as well in your journey as you learn to adjust to your solo travel life.

#6: You Will Learn How to Be Independent

If you haven’t figured it out by now, you will probably have to do everything on your own. Congrats! You’re officially “adulting”!

By all means, we encourage you to be as independent as possible. Not only will you master your adulting skills faster, but you will have a far better experience once you learn the ropes. And if you still need help, you can always ask your family (and your Adelante Abroad team) for some assistance. We’re always here to help and want to make this “adulting” abroad experience the best one ever.

Dealing with Loneliness Abroad - Adelante Abroad

Dealing with Loneliness Abroad

Dealing with Loneliness Abroad - Adelante Abroad

Considering studying or interning abroad and worried about being away from home for too long? Loneliness abroad is a completely normal feeling, and anyone can have some discomfort while in a new place, whether it’s culture shock or being on your own for the first time.

Here are some ways to ease your transition when living abroad:

Put Yourself First

Allow yourself enough space and comfort when adjusting, and give yourself a break if you need to. Your physical and mental health are the most important; taking care of yourself always comes first.

If you’re feeling under the weather in any way, give yourself some time to rest – use Adelante Abroad’s resources provided during your trip if you feel the need to visit a local doctor in your city. Use common de-stress methods such as breathing exercises, yoga, writing in a journal, or even soaking up in a bubble bath. Do whatever you can in order to feel “at-home” in your new place abroad.

Search Online for Other Expat Blogs

Chances are that someone else has travelled to the same city that you’re going to (okay, pretty high chances). Our team provides you with as much information as we can about the neighborhood you’re staying in and the resources available to you with your package; however, there are several websites and blogs made from expats currently living or have experience living in the same area.

Adelante also provides you with access to a private Facebook group before and during your travels so that you can network and potentially meet up with other Adelante Abroad candidates staying in your city.

Join the Club

Outside of working or studying within your program abroad, you can join fun clubs or groups in your neighborhood area, where you can mingle and network with locals who share a common interest with you. Try looking for a group on Meetup, for example; you might even discover a new hobby while abroad!

Take a Class

You may sign up for any classes offered locally during your free time while abroad. Take up an art class with other like-minded locals, or even take tours in nearby museums to learn more about your city’s culture. You can learn something new while also meeting someone new!

Get Uncomfortable

If the above ideas are not available, you can go out and introduce yourself to new people in the city. While this may be a scary thing to do for you, getting out of your comfort zone may be the solution to your homesickness. Ask the locals about the best places to purchase lunch or dinner, offer to spend time with someone, or even give a simple gesture to a stranger.

Please note: Make sure to follow any resources provided to you before and during your trip about safety when going out alone in the city. By staying safe and following city guidelines and tips, you’ll have no problems meeting new people and having a happy experience.

Get Used to Being on Your Own

Being homesick is a feeling that should be taken seriously, but it can also be temporary. Many candidates abroad experience this for a couple of weeks and then adjust to their environment soon after.

Set weekly and daily goals for yourself, such as creating a routine before your internship or classes, or making at least one new friend each week. Focus more on absorbing your new environment and less on reminiscing with people back home (maybe call your family here and there to let them know you’re okay).

Going abroad is an amazing opportunity, but it is okay to go through regular ups and downs while travelling. Remember that this is only a temporary part of your once-in-a-lifetime experience!