Adelante Abroad HQ Sevilla Trip

Adelante Abroad HQ Sevilla Trip: Rosanna’s Experience

Written by Social Media Intern, Rosanna Ramirez

Intern in Sevilla

Traveling to Sevilla with Adelante

Where do I start? Sevilla was absolutely beautiful! I’m grateful for the opportunities and experiences I’ve had here with Adelante Abroad since starting as an intern this summer. We explored Sevilla the way a candidate would experience traveling abroad and it was phenomenal! Unfortunately, time flies when you’re having fun. I can honestly say I left hoping that one day I’d be able to go back and become a candidate with Adelante. Sevilla is definitely the perfect destination to intern or study abroad!

The streets of Seville are filled with colors and the neighborhoods have fascinating architectural styles. It was mind-blowing! It would take a minute to sink in just how beautiful everything was from left to right. Every building, street, or business looked like it came from a perfect picture. From left to right, top to bottom, the view was breathtaking. Sevilla allows you to forget about all of your problems and be filled with wonder as you walk down the street.

Intern in Sevilla

Walking the Streets of Sevilla

I can’t express how fulfilling this experience was. Stepping outside of your comfort zone may sometimes be scary but in the end, you’ll be glad you did. Sometimes you have to go for it and it’s not every day that you get an opportunity to do so. Every day was a new adventure, to visit a new place and explore life in the streets of Sevilla. Getting around was extremely easy, walking distance was fairly 20 minutes or you could use the metro line that was not confusing at all, compared to LA and all the traffic.

Getting lost through the streets of Seville turned out to be the best adventures. Right around the corner from our apartment, there were many places to eat tapas and have a cold beer, and roughly with a 10-minute walk, you would be able to go the historical structures and wonderful places.

Sevillanos: Voted the Most Welcoming

Everyone in Seville is really kind and welcoming! Whether it was to go out to grab something to eat or explore the city, people would greet you and offer to help. One time as I stopped by the Plaza Jesús de la Pasión for some ice cream and crepes, the gentleman there began a very pleasant conversation and even offered some recommendations. Of course, the Spanish Institute team in Seville was beyond sweet and welcoming, as they showed us around some must-see sites of the city.

Intern in Sevilla

See You Soon, Sevilla

This experience was definitely one of a kind and of course one for the books! It opened my eyes and soul to more than I imagined (across the world to say the least). There’s so much to see and live outside of our daily routines and local destinations. Since there are days that we become so immune to what is happening around us, a quick breeze outside of our daily routines and comfort zone is necessary to appreciate the smaller things in life.

Intern in Sevilla

For me personally, the small things are what make you feel, live, think and understand new things. Because at the end of the day it’s those experiences and memories that you create that you will cherish in life. There’s a whole world outside of your window waiting to be explored! So thank you Adelante Abroad for this one in a lifetime experience and, Sevilla, I promise I’ll see you again soon!

 

If you’re interested in traveling and interning in Sevilla, check out the Sevilla page where you can find several sectors that are popular and more! Thinking about applying to intern abroad Spring 2019? It’s not too late!

Studying Abroad

Trabajando Con Esteban: Studying Abroad

Studying Abroad

Candidate Esteban C. is a Healthcare Intern in Madrid, Spain. This isn’t his first, or second, time studying abroad or learning abroad. He has studied and interned abroad three other times before coming to Adelante Abroad. His time in Madrid has opened him up to new experiences and the LGBTQ culture in Spain.

Thinking About Studying Abroad

So, you’re debating whether or not to study abroad? Going away to a new location can be frightening for sure, but can also be incredibly rewarding. The chance to immerse yourself in a new place, in a new culture, meeting new people is something most don’t get to experience. Being abroad allows you to explore the world and discover things about yourself that you otherwise would not be able to. Despite this, there is a certain nervousness about going abroad. This can stem from living in an unfamiliar place, being out of the country for the first time, leaving behind family and friends, being lonely, or leaving a comfort zone. Yet, these exact fears are the reasons you should be going. Don’t you want to learn how to deal with these challenges?

Esteban C.

Learning Outside of the Classroom

Studying abroad can allow you to experience things that you could not in a traditional classroom. Taking language classes are great, but realistically they teach you mostly technical information, such as how to read and write, but little emphasis is placed on the conversation. Going to a place where the language is not your own forces you to adapt and learn quickly. Immersion is widely known as the best way to learn anything, especially a new language. You can observe what natives say, how they say it, and thus adapt your vocabulary to be more genuine.

Academically, you can take classes from other professors with varied backgrounds, which allows you to have a unique perspective on the subject offered. Many courses have more hands-on activities which strengthen the material as well as exposes you to more environments that hone your skills. It may be easier, depending on your field, to work abroad than at home, which leads to valuable experience you can bring back. You meet people from all over the world, as well as natives wherever you go. Many of these friendships last for life! Being abroad allows you to travel to a new, exotic place, where you can explore by yourself or others.

Esteban C.

Studying, Traveling & Discovering Yourself

Although daunting, there are tons of reasons to study abroad! You also don’t need to go for a long time, as programs can last from a month to multiple years. Many programs have financial aid, and there are plenty of grants to apply for if money is an issue. From taking marine ecology courses in Belize to working with LGBT rights in Spain, from researching sharks and rays in the Bahamas to studying urban ecology in Singapore, I have had the opportunity to see the world. I really believe that because of my own study abroad experiences, I have learned more about how the world works and been exposed to things that would be impossible to see in a traditional classroom. If you have the time or opportunity to go abroad, take advantage of it! It is definitely worth considering.

 

If you’re interested in Adelante Abroad’s Study Abroad Programs, check out our Seville Semester and Summer Study Abroad pages. Interested in expanding your resume? Scroll through our internship sectors, including Medical and LGBTQ, and see what we have to offer.

Trabajando Con Esteban: Healthcare Work in the LGBT Community

Esteban C. is currently a healthcare intern in Madrid for a local LGBT organization. The work he is doing for the LGBT community in Spain is impacting the locals. 

Adjusting to Spain

LGBT Spain

 

It has been two months since I landed in sunny Madrid, and I can’t believe my time in this city is coming to an end. The insight into the Spanish culture, language, and lifestyle are unlike anything I’ve experienced before. The people I have worked with, the places I’ve seen, the food I’ve eaten have left lasting impacts on me. I came into the program a little anxious, and to be honest, the first few weeks were difficult. It was difficult adjusting to the time difference, the transportation system, a new internship, and being alone in a new place.

Spanish is my first language so I did not take the Spanish classes offered. It left me lonely and prevented me from meeting any fellow travelers. I had trouble with figuring out how to get around, and since I did not know anyone I was nervous to go out. This fear was unlike me, as I am an incredibly social person, but for some reason, I felt uncomfortable. This led to an almost debilitating anxiety that kept me in my apartment most days after work. Once I became a little more confident with the Spanish, the metro, and living on my own I was able to get out and take advantage of all Madrid has to offer.

Healthcare in the LGBT Community

LGBT Spain

 

I came to Spain to work with a Health internship with an LGBT organization called Fundación Triangulo. I worked different hours depending on the needs of the organization, from scheduling rapid HIV tests to tabling with the Spanish Red Cross on the street. Spain takes its summer vacation in August, so when my internship location closed for 2 weeks, I worked with another organization called COLEGAS, another LGBT group, and helped educate the local community about LGBT rights as well as volunteered at a food stand to help during the Fiestas de Lavapies, one of three religious festivals celebrated for the first 2 weeks in Madrid.

Through this work, I was able to work closely with members of the LGBT community as well as local citizens and develop my interpersonal, educational, and organizational skills. Being able to observe how HIV tests are done and the struggles that Spanish members of the LGBT community still face was eye-opening and something that would have been difficult to do in the United States. I was given a glimpse into how a local NGO works and the intricacies that come from the day-to-day job. Since one of my majors is Global Health, I was able to apply what I learned in my classes and experience working in the public health sector, albeit in another country.

The Culture

LGBT Spain

While I worked hard from Monday to Friday, I still took the time to enjoy myself. I tried tons of new food, visited tons of museums, met many new people, and even traveled a little around Spain! Through weekend trips through Barcelona, Toledo, Seville, and Granada, I learned more about the rich culture this country has to offer. Surprisingly, I learned a lot about myself and did things I never had before. Like staying in a hostel and going to a music festival alone. The travelers I met and the great times I had will stay with me forever.

Madrid is a bustling city, combining old architecture with the hustle and commerce of a modern city; however, it’s this juxtaposition which creates its unique flair. Overall, my summer has been a wild ride, but certainly a welcome one. If you are looking to travel abroad, Spain is the place to do it!

Learn more about Adelante Abroad’s Madrid, Healthcare and LGBTQ programs at www.adelanteabroad.com.

The Dos & The Don’ts of Traveling in Spain

 

You need to know the Dos and the Don’ts of traveling in Spain if you’re planning to blend in, or at least attempting to. Traveling is very exciting but there’s a lot of planning and packing that has to get done. Yet, sometimes we forget to do one of the most important parts… research on the culture! It is important to have cultural knowledge of the specific place you’re traveling in order to avoid any international trouble as well! We’ve all heard stories…

Here’s What You Need to Know…

1. Passports must be valid for at least 3 months after your planned departure date. You may be denied boarding and/or denied entry to any of the 26 European countries in the Schengen area. Make sure you’re not left behind!

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2. Leave regionalism and religion out of your discussion topics:

Regionalism and religious topics are very sensitive for Spaniards. Avoid swearing and using God’s name in vain, it may offend the people around you.

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3. Catalonia has its own language and culture – They really take pride in their own language and culture, again be cautious about bringing up regionalism topics.

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4. Don’t even think about walking around the city streets with a swimsuit. It is illegal in cities like Palma de Mallorca, Malaga, and Barcelona. Unless you are on the beach or surrounding streets, you may end up with a fine! It’s not worth the Instagram post… make sure to bring a cover-up.

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5. DO Dress accordingly- If you are visiting a sacred place, a monastery or church make sure to dress accordingly to avoid any trouble. Spaniards follow seasonal fashion rules! Leave those shorts back home if you’re planning to go during winter.

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6. DO Learn about their culture- Myths and beliefs they have, like not passing the salt shaker from hand to hand. According to Spanish belief, it is bad luck to do so! Don’t forget to leave a cactus on your window, it will ward off evil spirits from entering your home.

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A little superstitious…

7. Friday the 13th? Nope, it’s Tuesday 13 – Don’t even think about leaving bed.
Tuesday= bad luck. Their saying for Tuesday is: En Martes, ni te cases, ni te embarques, ni de tu casa te apartes – which translates to “On Tuesday, don’t get married, don’t board, don’t leave the house.”

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Late dinner is the new late night snack

8. Don’t expect dinner before 9 PM. Don’t plan to have dinner before 9 PM, restaurants won’t open before. Trust me, you don’t want to be THAT person.

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Don’t think you’re the only one who is late…

9. Be patient, don’t rush! Expect to wait 15 to 30 minutes. Spaniards typically are not strict about punctuality so, if you’re running a bit late, relax! DO take your time.

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10. El Coco- Who hasn’t heard about hundreds of stories about the Boogieman? In Spain, children refer to the Boogieman as ‘El Coco’, the terrifying creature that eats or kidnaps kids who misbehave. According to legend in the 20th century, ‘El Coco’ was Francisco Ortega, El Moruno, who was sick of tuberculosis and was told the cure was to drink children blood, so he did, by kidnapping a 7-year-old boy. Don’t leave your naughty children unattended.

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At the end of the day, make sure you make friends while abroad. They might give you a few tips that are hard to find on the internet. If you’re interested in interning abroad in Spain, read more on Madrid, Barcelona, and Seville.

Candidate Blog Post: Nathan’s Adventures in Uruguay

 

I am currently wrapping up my two months in Uruguay and it’s left me with so much knowledge of the language and the culture of the area in and around the Rio de La Plata. I often have thought that I adjust very well to new environments, but my first few days here were overwhelming without a doubt. The weather change, the language, learning the city, and just learning how things are done in a culture takes time, but I wish, looking back, that I hadn’t been so timid. I felt like everyone was watching me when I went out and I was so afraid of taking a wrong step so it took me a while to get in the habit of getting out and about regularly when in reality, there was nothing to be afraid of.

The people in Uruguay were very welcoming, I was lucky to make a friend that spoke good English who showed me around the city and I found the culture to be very relaxed. My Uruguayan friend uses the phrase “Manejate” to describe the culture here, which more or less translates to “Suit yourself”. Uruguayans are very relaxed and friendly so if you’re considering an excursion here, I would highly recommend it. The professors who taught my classes were extremely helpful and friendly and I met many other international students at the school who I became very close with.

All the advice you hear about these types of trips is true, the sooner you get yourself getting out and meeting people, the better your experience will be, but it’s easier said than done. I have taken so much from my trip here so far beyond my internship and I would recommend it to anyone considering such a trip. Cheers from Uruguay!

If you’re interested in interning abroad in Uruguay like Nathan, check out our Uruguay page.

Scotland from a Candidate’s Perspective

The Scotland Abroad Program spots fill up fast because of how organized and affordable the program is. Our two programs, Equine and Observation & Research, include housing, transportation from the airport, meals throughout the week and more! These programs allow you to expand your resume with international experience and give you the opportunity to travel the beautiful landmarks in Scotland.

Scotland – Equine Program

The Equine Program is a special four-week program available for animal science and pre-veterinary students. Candidates are enrolled into two courses, Equine Anatomy & Physiology and Equine Fitness. These two units will give you six hours of US credit and are fully transferable towards your degree. When future employers look at a candidate’s resume, they find interest in their experience abroad because it reassures them that the candidate is capable of working outside their comfort zone. Candidates take advantage of this learning experience and travel on the weekends to nearby locations, which tends to be affordable.

Scotland

 

Scotland – Observation & Research Program

The Observation & Research Program is aimed at serious students with academic observational and research assignments in different sectors, which include agricultural business, ecology and conservation, psychology, speech and hearing sciences and more! This six-week program, like the Equine Program, begins in mid-May and is one of our most popular summer programs.

Scotland

Candidate Spotlight – Natalie M.

Our Scotland programs are one of the most popular programs for our summer candidates. We like to receive feedback and stories from our candidates about their experiences during the internship/study abroad program itself. It gives you, the reader, a better understanding of what you could possibly do in the future.  Our Observation and Research candidate, Natalie M., wrote about her time in Scotland and gave us more insight on what it’s like to be an intern abroad.
Check it out!

Observation & Research Candidate, Natalie M., Blog

Scotland

 

 

Interning Abroad after Graduation

Why Should You Intern Abroad after Graduation?

For most seniors, graduation is just around the corner, thank goodness. The instant panic of “What am I going to do now?” hits you real quick. You feel like you haven’t learned enough to step out into the “real world.” What happened to the confident junior who was so ready to graduate? Not here. You’re looking through job applications, ready to send in your mediocre resume, when all you want to do is try new things and do something adventurous before getting stuck at a 9 to 5 like the rest of your friends. Who wants to hire a recent graduate?

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Interning abroad gives you the opportunity to work AND travel, it’s the best of both worlds. There are many benefits to interning abroad, especially after graduation. Pack up your things and do something for YOU. You’ve worked too hard these past four to five years not to treat yourself. You’re not just wondering around in a different country; you’re doing hands-on work and making use of that brand new degree.

Work Experience

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An intern abroad means you’re going to be working part-time for a couple of days during the week. You finally have the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned these last few years and apply them to real situations. As an intern, you’re placed into the workforce without having the pressure of long-term commitment to the job, and you get to learn a little bit of everything. It’s the dating version of relationships, who would have known.

Internships give you the opportunity to learn what you didn’t have the chance to learn at school, or probably couldn’t learn from just going to school.  Hands-on experience is more fulfilling than sitting in a classroom, and you learn more about the work environment while adjusting to daily challenges and learning how to handle new situations. You’re no longer just “adulting” because you’re an adult (somewhat).

Future Employment

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Future employers want to know that you’re capable of handling the work in your industry and keep yourself professional. The first thing they’re going to check on your resume is your past work experiences and for how long you were there. An article released by Psychology Today showed how 82 percent of hiring managers wanted to see a formally completed internship on resumes. They’re practically a necessity, and it’s a struggle for students to find internships nowadays because the demand for them is high.

If interning improves your chances of getting hired, can you imagine how good it looks when you’ve interned in another country? By completing an internship abroad, you’re exposing yourself to growth far outside your comfort zone. An internship abroad shows employers that you’re open to new things and have experienced a global perspective of the industry you’re working in. You’ve interacted with people from diverse backgrounds, and it makes you stand out. So many cookie points.

Taking Chances

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When was the last time you tried something different or did something you’ve never done before? Think about it. As humans, we try to put ourselves into a routine because it feels safe. For once in your life, don’t place yourself into a routine.  When you’re abroad you don’t have a set routine; you have to learn how to adjust to the new culture and surroundings. It’s not a bad thing.

Travel

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Travel. Travel. Travel. Everyone talks about how much they want to travel but they never actually do it. You don’t want to regret not visiting half of the world in your 20s. This is your chance! You might be working, but there is such thing as weekends.

As an intern, your work hours aren’t as intense, and you have more time to do things, things you weren’t able to do when you were going to school. Try new food. Oh, all of the good food you’ve seen in travel shows and movies where the main character is living their best life in a new country. The time to travel is now, so stop pushing it aside.

Self-Growth

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You’re finally out on your own. Experiencing the world without anything tying you down is fulfilling. It’s an incredible feeling. It might seem scary, being in a new place without your family or your friends. Trust me, you’ll make some new friends, and this new place will feel like home. Independence opens you up, and you learn more about yourself than you imagined.

You also get to learn what it’s like to work in an industry you’ve studied. Did you make the right choice? If not, you have the chance to learn what you do like to do. You become a lot more confident because you know yourself a more now. You’re basically having your own Eat Pray Love moment, and that’s fine.

 

Don’t doubt your capabilities. After graduating, grab your passport and explore the world, yourself, and the career you see yourself having in the future. It will have more of a positive impact on you than you realize.

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months - Adelante Abroad

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months?

Should I Go Abroad for 1 Month or 6 Months - Adelante Abroad

The obvious answer is you should go abroad for as long as possible! Everyone wants to travel abroad, that’s a no brainer, but obviously you clicked this blog post because you are trying decide between one or six months.

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A one month internship or study abroad program is usually a faculty-led program by your school, volunteering or teaching English. All of those choices are very good options and one should consider those if you have the time and money. However, you are really limiting yourself to learning about the culture and living like a local by only going for one month. You might have a week or two of language courses, depending on where you go and your program, and that leaves you two weeks to really be immersed in the culture. To me, a one month program is like a sample at Costco. You get a taste of it and you leave wanting more.

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If you were to consider taking a one month program, you should do it as a way to earn college credit. A faculty-led program is expensive but you do get to earn that credit abroad, which is always a nice thing to experience. Plus your course will be taught in English! So you don’t have to worry too much about being completely lost in the textbooks.

A six month internship or study abroad program is something I would highly recommend and encourage people to take. Six months is a long time in a country you’ve never lived in and – to me – that is so exciting! You have that adjustment period of about a month (it’s different for everyone) and after that you have five months to really just live like a local and be completely immersed in the food, culture, traditions and festivals! In six months, you will be knowledgeable about the city and country you are living in. It’s a no brainer you’ll adapt to your surroundings but it’s the most rewarding when you get to say you’ve experienced life abroad for six months.

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People will be in awe and will ask you tons of questions about your time abroad. If you’re there for a month you’ll leave saying, “I wish I stayed longer,” or “I wish I picked a six month internship instead.” Do you want to sound like that? I know I wouldn’t.

I was featured in a video with Alexandria, Adelante’s digital marketing specialist, discussing why you should take an internship for more than three months. There is some useful information in that video and reiterates some of the points made in this post. Take a look and see why it’s important to take an internship or a study abroad program for more than three months.

Regardless, the decision to go abroad is a huge one! You should congratulate yourself for just wanting to study or intern abroad. Do what makes you comfortable. If going for a month is your thing, then by all means sign up for a month! But if you’re looking to really experience life abroad, a six month program would be best.

About Our Contributor:

Drew - Digital Marketing Intern - Adelante Abroad

Drew is Adelante HQ’s Social Media & Marketing intern for Fall 2017 and is currently a Public Relations major at Cal State Long Beach. He has participated in a youth exchange program in Dakar, Senegal and an international basketball tournament in Japan. One of his many traveling goals is to step foot on every continent on this big blue planet, and yes, even Antarctica.

Adaeze in Seville - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Candidate Spotlight: Internship in Seville – Adaeze C.

Adaeze in Seville - Candidate Spotlight - Adelante Abroad

Why Choose to Intern in Seville?

President of Art Museum - Adaeze - Internship in Seville - Adelante AbroadChoosing Seville was easy, after speaking with a close friend who lived in Spain for many years, she suggested Seville because of the warmth of the people and its many festivals and holidays throughout the year like the ‘Semana Santa’ and ‘Fería de Abril’ which she knew I would enjoy. In addition to that, I was sold when she said the people from Barcelona speak a whole other language, Catalan, which may have been a bit difficult for me to grasp since I had only been taking Spanish lessons for two months prior to my leaving.

More About My Internship Program in Seville

Adaeze - Art Museum - Internships in Seville - Adelante AbroadMy internship has been an invaluable experience thus far and a turning point in my life. Besides experiencing independence from my parents (living on my own) for the first time, which I must admit feels amazing, what I am cherishing the most is embracing this new chapter and being present in the moment, experiencing every step towards creating a bright future for my family and country with respect to preserving the legacy of my father. The internship placement at ´Fundacion Pintor Amalio´ was a perfect choice, there are many similarities between my father and the painter Amalio. Amalio was a teacher, artist and poet, who created a foundation and donated ´365 Gestures of the Giralda´ 8 days before his death in 1995. The Foundation is currently headed by one of his daughters María José.

I am learning so much and really cannot wait to implement what I have learned when I return home. I am truly inspired. Spain is a magical place overflowing with love and appreciation for its culture. I believe I am well on my way and eternally grateful to Adelante Abroad for making it possible.

 

 

 

About the Contributor:

Adaeze is currently taking part in a 6-month art internship in Seville, Spain. Hear more about Adaeze’s journey on her blog!

 

Want to learn more about our program? Check out our internships in Seville!

Feria de Abril in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Feria de Abril in Seville: A Guide to One of Seville’s Most Popular Festivals

Feria de Abril in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Here at Adelante, we highly encourage our candidates to engulf themselves into new cultures. Whether they participate an internship or study abroad program, there’s always something to explore and experience for the first time.

Spring is one of our favorite times of the year due to the festivities held around Spain and South America. One of the most popular spring festivals is the Seville Fair, or Feria de abril de Sevilla.

 

Adaeze - Feria de Abril - Adelante Abroad

Adaeze C. preparing for Feria de Abril

What is Feria de Abril?

Feria de abril de Sevilla is held in Seville, Spain about two weeks after Easter Holy Week. The events run from Monday all the way to the following Sunday, but it’s very common to see festivities begin as early as that Saturday.

The first official night, Monday night, is known as “La Noche del Pescaito” or “Fish Night.” During the evening, fish is traditionally served for dinner while the Mayor of Seville switches on thousands of lights at midnight to emphasize the beginning of the festival.

By Tuesday, the festival brings in horseback parades filled with carriages, riders, bullfighters and breeders. Women wear their favorite flamenco dresses and dance with men dressed in traditional suits.

The rest of the week proceeds with more festivities as well as bull fights. Shows are held at the Plaza de Toros, and the top bullfighters appear during this week. You can easily participate in local activities and enjoy street food, circuses / carnivals, and dancing.

 

Flamenco Dress - Internships in Seville - Adelante Abroad

Adaeze C. and Adelante’s Seville Program Director, Catherine

What is the origin of Feria de Abril?

The traditions from the Seville Fair can be traced all the way back to the early 1800’s, where a cattle fair was held and continued every year afterward. Each year, more and more people joined in to celebrate and socialize together in Seville, which brought in ‘casetas’ for food, bars and music. By the 1920’s, Feria de abril became one of Seville’s biggest fiestas.

Looking to celebrate in Seville? If you missed this year’s Seville Fair, there’s still plenty of festivities and celebrations going on in the next few months!

There are also other celebrations happening in other parts of Spain, Ecuador, Chile, Mexico, and Uruguay! Apply now to take advantage of Summer start dates!